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.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
" bankht an intern for bank of america found dead after working nearly three straight days. police a defense lawyer says the jury is stacked against this teenager who is charged with shooting a baby between the eyes right in front of his mother. >> i can't believe that they could shoot a baby in the face. >> shepard: the defense claims the accused killer is not getting a fair trial. >> one black male on a panel of 48 people. >> shepard: tonight, the push to start over and the ruling from a judge. plus police say three teenagers were bored so they decided to cale college student for fun. >> it was well thought out. >> something -- >> >> shepard: we will hear from the mother of one of the suspects. and high school students claim they are uncovered an oreo ripoff. >> it looks like the stuffing on the double stuff is slightly less than a real double stuff oreo. >> double stuff is less than oreo. >> tonight the cookie company responds. but first from fox this tuesday night. a 21-year-old intern at bank of america collapsed and died after he reportedly worked three back-to-back shifts of
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
's making news. america's children are slimming down. for the first time in decades, we can say our children are not getting fatter. a study from the cdc that examined the nation's preschoolers found in 18 states, the obesity rate is actually falling. that's the good news. the bad news is the obesity rate held steady in do states. some of the states, ten states overall were examined due to the way data is collected. but a lot of people are crediting michelle obama's let's move campaign for this good news. it certainly helps keep the weight off. >> bill: she's got to get some credit for that. and just raising awareness of the problem. >> absolutely. that's the good news. >> bill: a lot of republicans are beating up on her saying this is silly. no, this is a serious problem. >> it really is. that was the good news. the bad news, of course, if you want to ruin your breakfast, taco bell is here to help. they announced they're kicking off a new breakfast item. they've been trying to kick off a breakfast menu in recent years but this latest hellish creation is the waffle taco. it is a fried waffle
look outside the beltway from "special report." we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] america's favorite endless shrimp is back! people wait for this promotion all year long. and now there are endless ways to love it... from crispy to spicy to savory. [ man ] you cannot make a bad choice. [ male announcer ] red lobster's endless shrimp! as ch as you like, y way you like! you can have your shrimp. and you can eat it, too. [ male announcer ] try our new soy wasabi grilled shrimp or classic garlic shmp scampi. all just $15.99 for a limited time. it's gonna be a hit this year. [ male announcer ] red lobster's endless shri is now! we would neveriss endless shrimp. [ male announcer ] but it won't last forever. so come and sea food differently. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn,orever. relief is at hand. for many, nexium provides 24-hour heartburn relief and may be available for just $18 a month. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doct
. >>peter: no one knows more about corporate america than you. you said this is akin to what in terms of corporations? >> the turn around specialist. >>peter: when those turn-around guys come in, don't they have targs -- targets? don't they say your contract is going to end unless you bring our expenses down x percent or you increase our numbers up this way? >> i don't know whether that is in this guy's contract. he's got a thee-year contract. -- a three-year contract. ask yourself is it not cheaper to spend a half million dollars on a high-priced professional than going into bankruptcy. >>peter: what should we be doing on that? great question po pose today. you'll be posing other questions and giving more answers at 9:20. >> i'm free with my opinion. >>peter: they are free but they're worth a lot. how does the government plan to stop leaks at the n.s.a.? the plan to replace people with machines. really? okay. then just can't get the kid to sleep? how these interactive pajamas can change your life if you're a parent. i think it's working. good morning. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ]
contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we will delve deeper into that. what i want to give him a couple of minutes at a moderate is framing a li
of america's most vocal critics. we shouldn't forget the difference between the ability of our government to collect information online under strict guidelines and for narrow purposes than the willingness of some other governments to throw their own citizens in prison for what they say online. >> stephanie: talking to you, putin. >> we're not there. >> stephanie: right. [ ♪ battle hymn of republic ] >> i'm with alan grayson. >> stephanie: what did edward snowden get wrong? everything. andrew lightman in the "l.a. times." we posted this up at stephanie miller facebook. snowden is out of his limbo. i hope the food is lousy, the winter is cold and the internet access is awful. >> it is russia. you're pretty much guaranteed all three of those. >> stephanie: i worry more about the damage snowden has done and could still do to strike the right balance between privacy and security. i do, too. he says those following snowden should understand two key points. first, though many things need to be kept secret in today's dangerous world, the line between secret and not secret is stark. the harsh t
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
not get back to anybody else in america. and she's hiding everything that she can. >> that was the anger and frustration she feels. but what amazed me from talking to the other family members who lost their children, who lost their siblings is just they just want answers. and they don't want this to be political. it seems obvious we need more answers. it also seems obvious this shouldn't be about the finger pointing and blame game going on in washington. i want to let all your viewers know, people can go to our blog because these families have foundations, ways to try to help to make sure this doesn't happen again. i hope people will go to those foundation websites and learn more about the families. >> you've spent a lot of time on this story. you put together a great team for tonight's special. what's the biggest takeaway you take from this documentary? >> reporte >> one of the things that amazed me the most, could this be prevented? the answer to that question is yes. we'll talk to one of the men who briefed chris stevens on security. his takeaway, the americans knew there were all the
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. seeing how exactly this happened that they allegedly shot this 22-year-old innocent man in the back and killed him. what else did you see on that surveillance video? story behind it. test [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. >>> our fifth story "outfront" death of a legend, best selling a
out what the world thinks about america. people want to see americans stay home. host: that refers to how america's involvement in afghanistan weighs upon positions being made. here's what he had to say. [video clip] collects my preference would be that the national community already asked forceful. is ane have seen incapacity for the security counsel to move forward in the face of a clear violation of international norms. i recognize that here in the united states and in great parts of theany world there is a certain afghanistanen there's a suspicion of any military action. on the other hand it is important for us to recognize hundreds of innocent children were killed. -- were killed through the use of a weapon that 98% of a weapon that says should not be used in a war. there is no action that we are sending a signal that that international norm doesn't mean much. host: cooper is up next. i can't help but think -- caller: i can't help but think it sabotages the democratic party. there is not a lot going on there. it's using a sabotage of the democratic party. it sabotage ofe the d
on america. u.s. officials have discovered an electronic meeting between more than 20 al qaeda top leaders and they did that by following the internet trail of an al qaeda courier. now, this is according to reporting by the daily beast. you'll recall it was that meeting of al qaeda leaders that prompted the obama administration to issue an unprecedented terror alert ordering the closing of nearly two dozen american embassies in the mideast and north africa. josh roggen is the reporter that broke the story. josh, let me start with this, when you hear the word courier and al qaeda you think of the capture of osama bin laden, a physical courier driving the car that they were able to follow, so we've heard about this before. but this is an electronic trail, that's how they were able to find this. how do they do it? >> so, here's what happened, after a seven-hour internet conference between all of these leaders, the details of that conference, the minutes of it, were given to this courier and he then took it and tried to send it around to a greater distribution list inside the al qaeda communit
will agree with you on that. overall, it is not a gloom and doom situation in america. that is my personal view. i think that in time, it will work itself out. title -- we the must do something about the entitlement program. if it were not for obama, it has been this way for a wild -- you cannot blame him about folks who are getting all of these so- called free services in my opinion. host: what kind of business? caller: we are in mental health. host: and why are you republican? caller: because i believe in their tenets, their principles, smaller government, i believe in that. strong military, i believe not. but they work hard. throw my neighbors overboard because i'm doing well. one time i was not doing so well. so because i'm doing well now, do i say to hell with them and throw them aboard? i don't think so. so we have got to have a better approach how we help you use programs come the state understand you have a lot of folks out here give support because if you give them free stuff, there was a advantage of it. but i do not say because i'm doing well now, to heck with them. all right, l
in america today is amazon basoz which is going to rank up there with apple steve jobs. there are huge similarihat he's doing with his business, and what steve jobs did. >>steve: give me examples >> basoz takes all the company profits and plows it back into the business. traditionally wall street doesn't like that. it wants a piece of those profits -- >>andrew: would it be fair to say he got this for a steal, that it was worth maybe ten times this much money ten years ago? >> maybe so, but that was when the "washington post" was a newspaper you bought physically unread. that's not true today. >>andrew: was it a distress sale? >> no. he's bought content. putting this on to his amazon entire for his subscribers. that's another thing very similar between bezos and steve jobs. bezos makes amazon very user friendly, just like jobs made the iphone, the ipod, the ipad friendly. bezos extremely private, the same as steve jobs. amazon is the same in the sense the stock went straight up. >>gretchen: he claims he's going to keep amazon separate. what i am interested in knowing is why would this b
the face of gun violence in america as horrific as sandy hook was is not some suburban kid, it's a brown or black kid in the ghetto. if you look at chicago, chicago's on track for two sandy hooks per month. usually against another black person. yet chicago is about a third, a third and a third black, white and hispanic. why would so many murders come from the black community? the answer is so many kids come from parents without fathers. you look at violation, we're talking about gang-related kids, usually young kids. there was a documentary that my dad and i discussed in the book called resurrection, and it was about truth pack shakur. tupac shakur. and he said white people may like hearing me say this, but i know for a fact if i'd had a father in my life, i would have had discipline and confidence. and he went on to talk about the facth joid a did a father, he wanted structure, he wanted protection. and he went on to say in a way maybe a conservative right-winger might say that it is important for a boy to have a father in his life. a boy needs a father. tupac shakur said this. there's
's authors. we'll be talking to her just ahead. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. humans. we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back, offering exclusive products like optional better car replacement, where if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask an insurance expert about all our benefits today, like our 24/7 support and service, because at liberty mutual insurance, we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, so we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. plus, you could save hundreds when you switch, up to $423. call... today. liberty mutual insurance -- responsibility. what's your policy? >>> let's talk more now about the
calling benghazi a phony scandal 78 percent said it's a serious situation and law americas are outraged at news at suspects have been charged in the attack including the alleged leader have not been arrested. >> according to public safety we have terrorist attack where ambassador and three americans have been murdered. he is roaming around libya libyan authorities haven't picked him up. why isn't he being interrogated why isn't he in custody. if it's important enough to charge him. it's ladies and gentlemened he has been involv-- it's alleged involved, why isn't he in custody? >> a wild police chase ends with a suspect's car crashing and then flipping over. take a look at this. >> he is going 206 to make-- he going to have to make a turn here. look at him on the dirt and through the fence and rolling. >> it happened in san fernando in the valley. a man accused behind the wheel accused of car jacking a kia van. after 20 minutes of driving he got out of the vehicle and then surrendered to police. >> also happening overnight we learned that more than a dozen animals have been removed from
or elsewhere. we start with the news. it is just breaking now. i'm bill hemmer in "america's newsroom." martha has time with the family. good to see you heather. >> i'm heather childers. nice to be back. pentagon officials say the broad evacuation effort is due to the threat that already prompted the closure of 19 u.s. embassies across the middle east and after from. bill: greg palkot picks up the story live from london with the latest there what is the latest you're hearing on the ground in yemen, greg. >> reporter: latest from our contacts on the ground in yemen things are definitely getting serious there. fox news was told at least one c-117 u.s. military aircraft transported something like 90 non-essential staffers from the embassy. u.s. citizens outside the embassy told to leave immediately. we were on the phone with the embassy this morning. it certainly sounded like they were on high alert. we had been there, it is a well-secured embassy, but according to my contacts it is more secure today. additional tanks, armored personnel carriers, all around that place, u.s. surveillance aircraft
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
and turns out not to be the case, it dilutes america's recall moral authority and dilutes americans trust in government. what do you think? >> i think glen makes very good points in his piece. you may know him as inst-pundit. he is a big blogger. the larger point glen is getting at when you have a government that operates as if everything it does is simply self-justifying. that as richard nixon once said, if the president does it, it can't be illegal. barack obama says he can rewrite a congressionally-passed law on a whim or unilaterally without consulting congress because that's what he needs to do to make these changes, he is essentially, basically saying that the government is, is in effect a rogue operator and that whatever the government does is legal and whatever they can get away with is fine. you see that running the course throughout a lot, sometimes scandals, sometimes simply policy moves that this administration makes. there is deep irony here. this is the guy going around for five years, you know, insisting that government is us. and that we shouldn't be afraid of the governme
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. all your important legal matters in just minutes. protect your family... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. athto fight chronic.ms. osteoarthritis pain. to fight chronic low back pain. to take action. to take the next step. today, you will know you did something for your pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is a pain reliever fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. anti-depressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not for children under 18. peopl
and injuring 16 others. >>> bank of america is facing civil lawsuits from the department of justice and the securities and exchange commission. the suits claim the bank defrauded investors selling mortgage backed securities. bank of america accused of making false statements and failing to perform proper due diligence on risky mortgages from third party brokers. >>> what do you do when you flip your car twice and land on top of a bus stop? hail a cab, of course. this is crazy video. the driver rolled the car causing $5,000 worth of damage to the gas station. when his car stopped flipping the driver climbed out, hailed a taxi and took off. >> what do you say? >> there's almost nothing to say. >> nothing to say. we'll leave it at that. >> thanks. >> talk amongst yourselves. >> listen to the next segment. >> while talking amongst yourselveses. >> time for the political gut check. the stories you need out of washington and around the country. first mitt romney campaigned in the 2012 presidential election on getting rid of president obama's health care law. while attending his first poli
and concerned about things. >> that is on my business card. >> we replicate the procedures that america follows of authorizing stuff by legislation , setting decisions by court, supervising it by inspector general's. done in a to be secret way in order that enemies do not find out about it and could therefore it made it. that is the way it goes. >> and do not exclude the possibility of new legislation. if congress wants to fix it, they have oversight abilities to hear all this material in classified form and decide whether they want to tweak the law. >> you would prefer to see, i suspect, open debate before the supreme court, but you could go the congressional route to address the concerns you have raised. >> i guess they each have their own functions. one determines what the legislation should be. one determines what is constitutional. my preference would be that both get their shot at it. but that is just me. more,oing to ask only one because i am told there are 20 minutes remaining, and i want to give you time on the floor. briefly, would each of you give your observations on civil , a board
or anyone that he has followed strike any fear on our beloved citizens of the united states of america. >> cnn's ed lavendere is covering this from fort hood. ed, back to hasan and back to this less than two minutes statement, what did he say in that little time? what was your reaction to it in the courtroom? >> reporter: well, it was fascinating because the prosecutors had just spent the previous hour meticulously detailing how he carried out the massacre not too far away from where this trial is going on and how the 13 people were killed and more than 30 others were wound wounded. it was pretty painful to hear. prosecutors were talking about one pregnant woman who was pleading for the life of her child. she was pleading my baby, my baby, and you heard a shot and she was silent. hasan stood up and in a matter of moments took away all of that attention and said he claimed to be the shooter just right out of the gate. took away any pretense about whether or not this trial would be about his guilt or innocence. hasan basically declaring he is the shooter. he went on to say that the evide
to friday. back to "america's newsroom." >> i'm browne here for martha maccallum. they said it is out of caution and not related to the original threat. bill: we expect the president to address some specific concerns in a news conference from the white house. here is press secretary jay carney late yesterday on that. >> when it comes to protecting americans serving in our embassies and facilities around the world, it is very important to take the necessary precautions when there is this kind of credible threat information. bill: greg palkot leads our coverage. he's working the story out of london today. what is the latest out of pakistan, greg. >> reporter: that's right, bill. we were talking just a short while ago with officials at the u.s. embassy in islamabad, pakistan. they had confirm ad drawdown of what they called non-emergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in lahore. that is about 180 miles southeast of islamabad. that personnel is in fact being brought up to islamabad in that capital area. they also confirmed to us that it was all due to a specific threat against that ins
. unconstitutional. it goes against what america's founding fathers have said. >> that is a great question. prism program is largely classified. there has been some talk about it. i have to be careful with what i say. the bottom line is, there are too many people in congress right now who are forgetting that there is a constitution that restricts what they do. the point of the constitution is to restrict what the federal government does. in the name of security, they are forgetting that their first right or the is to protect liberties. that is why we have a government to ensure that we have liberty as a people. that is what they are forgetting. they are focused solely on the security aspect. ory think as long as the nsa some other agency is stopping bad guys, they can go after collecting information on all sorts of people and have no consequences. of course, there is a huge threat to that. we do not want the government to have this kind of data to use against americans in the future. >> yeah. about,'m also worried like, all the gay rights stuff. i'm thinking, like, this could be like the racism t
. >> he's got that little one looking at him. >>> could america be getting some of that power? yeah. variety is reporting will i. am is in talks to join the judging table for "american idol" after reports jennifer lopez may also return to the show. that means keith urban, jennifer lopez, will i. am. >> talk about a range. >> i know, i like. >>> the race is on to cast batman in the sequel to "man of steel," so ryan gosling. >> yes, please. >> joe, richard, all rumored to be in the running, but the front-runner, 46-year-old josh brolin. what do you think about that? >> i think it fits. >> wolf man from "true blood." >> i remember him from "magic mike." all i remember is "magic mike." >> mrs. cuomo threw me into a bowl of potato salad when we met him at a party. made me go up and introduce her. >> excuse me, hi! >> oh, my. >> we'll also throw chris into potato salad. >> i like potato salad. >> all right, guys. >> i love it, ryan gosling, thank you. >>> coming up next on "new day," also someone we love, matt damon gets a new look for his new movie. he's buff, he's tough, and he's sittin
that sudden new york city has the lowest ratio of teen-agers carrying guns than any city in america. >> steve: you got to wonder whether or not, since we do have on a wiretap one of the bad guys, one of the ailed gun smugglers saying, i'm not going to go into new york city's brooklyn because of stop and frisk, you got to wonder if that -- after that judge threw it out, you know, why not? let's go. >> brian: it is modified. the supreme court said it's constitutional. let's hope they get it back. meanwhile, red light cameras are supposed to bust the people that run red lights, right? turns out those eyes in the sky are going after drivers who did nothing wrong. >> steve: not the gum chewers again. and president obama has been back in washington for just one day and he's already planning on hitting the road to push his agenda. shouldn't he be sticking around to help unite congress? we have the governor next. stick around what makes your family smile? backflips and cartwheels. love, warmth. here, try this. backflips and camm, ok!s. ching! i like the fact that there's lots of different tastes goin
to say what is happening in rural america in general. what we have found is, particularly in the south and southwest, rural school districts have been consolidated almost to the hills. very large districts in their role self. we think, to a large extent, we have reached the economies of scale in these communities. that makes sense for those communities. but what happens, for the most part, you do not achieve cost savings and the quality that most proponents of consolidation assume that you will achieve by consolidation. particularly in the rural sites, you see it increased costs around transportation, lots more travel time for kids on buses, a much longer day. we have kids getting on the bus before daylight and they are getting off after sunset. when you factor those things into the formula of what is working, what should be the response to the small school problem -- and i do not like to think of it as a small school or small district problem -- it is a situation that exists that does not have to be problematic. when we look at it in terms of dollars saved by increasing numbers and re
, the central social problem in america. >> host: next call for mr. elder, we have about seven minutes left in our program. dennis in sharon, massachusetts. hi, dennis. dennis? >> caller: yes. can you hear me? yes -- >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: okay, great. i'm a great fan of c-span. i watch booktv every weekend. my father was born in 1892, i was his first son. when i was born, he was in 60 years old. he left macon, georgia, as he told we because he saw a black man being burned in the fountain of downtown macon, georgia. the point i would like to make is that i really believe it's, obviously, the father being in the household is a tremendous service to the children, without a doubt. but most importantly i really believe this thing about mind power. having the focus in order to be able to have a discipline to achieve what your goals are in life. the other thing i want to say is that there's a psychological underpinning that i believe hardly anybody talks about in which people aspire to be the anti-antihero. so a lot of this outburst that we see is really someone who really believes
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